Newcastle Laboratories

LDH (Lactate dehydrogenase), serum

Clinical Background:

Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a cytoplasmic enzyme present in all cells of the body with the highest concentrations in heart, liver, muscle, kidney, lung, and erythrocytes. As the LDH concentratio...

Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) is a cytoplasmic enzyme present in all cells of the body with the highest concentrations in heart, liver, muscle, kidney, lung, and erythrocytes. As the LDH concentration in tissues is about 500 times higher than that in plasma, damage of even a small amount of tissue can lead to a significant increase in activity in serum. As a consequence serum LDH concentrations can be elevated in a number of clinical conditions.  The total LDH measurable in serum consists of 5 isoenzymes, LD-1 to LD-5.

LDH is often used in monitoring changes in tumor burden after chemotherapy, although, lactate dehydrogenase elevations in patients with cancer are too erratic to be of use in the diagnosis of cancer.

Read More

Test Details

  • Discipline:

    Biochemistry

    Biochemistry

  • Specimen Container Adult:

    Serum-SST

    Serum-SST

  • Specimen Container Paediatric:

    Serum-Plain tube

    Serum-Plain tube

  • Minimum Volume Adult:

    1 mL blood

    1 mL blood

  • Minimum Volume Paediatric:

    0.5 mL blood

    0.5 mL blood

  • Sample Stability:

    Unseparated:  day of collection

    Separated:  at +15° to +25°C, 7 days

                          at +2° to +8°C, 4 days

     

    In certain disease states (e.g. hepatopathy, diseases of skeletal muscles, malign...

    Unseparated:  day of collection

    Separated:  at +15° to +25°C, 7 days

                          at +2° to +8°C, 4 days

     

    In certain disease states (e.g. hepatopathy, diseases of skeletal muscles, malignant tumours) the LDH-4 and 5 isoenzyme portions are increased and unstable in cooled and frozen samples. This may lead to an incorrect LDH value in samples collected from patients suffering from such diseases.

    Read More
  • Add On Test:

    Up to 24 hours. Samples after this time period are stored refrigerated and are therefore unsuitable for LDH measurement.

    All urgent add ons via telephone on 0191 282 4766, and must be confirmed via...

    Up to 24 hours. Samples after this time period are stored refrigerated and are therefore unsuitable for LDH measurement.

    All urgent add ons via telephone on 0191 282 4766, and must be confirmed via email to the appropriate email address

    tnu-tr.bloodsciencesadditions@nhs.net (internal)

    tnu-tr.bloodsciencesadditions@nhs.net (external)

    Read More
  • Interpretation:

    Marked elevations in lactate dehydrogenase (LD) activity can be observed in megaloblastic anemia, untreated pernicious anemia, Hodgkin's disease, abdominal and lung cancers, severe shock, and hypox...

    Marked elevations in lactate dehydrogenase (LD) activity can be observed in megaloblastic anemia, untreated pernicious anemia, Hodgkin's disease, abdominal and lung cancers, severe shock, and hypoxia.

     

    Moderate to slight increases in LD levels are seen in myocardial infarction (MI), pulmonary infarction, pulmonary embolism, leukemia, hemolytic anemia, infectious mononucleosis, progressive muscular dystrophy (especially in the early and middle stages of the disease), liver disease, and renal disease.

     

    In liver disease, elevations of LD are not as great as the increases in aspartate amino transferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT).

     

    Increased levels of the enzyme are found in about one third of patients with renal disease, especially those with tubular necrosis or pyelonephritis. However, these elevations do not correlate well with proteinuria or other parameters of renal disease.

    Read More
  • Reference Ranges:

    0 - 1 month: 125 – 765 IU/L

    1 montn - 1 year: 170 – 450 IU/L

    1 - 2 years: 155 – 395 IU/L

    2 - 15 years: 120 – 300 IU/L

    15 years and over: 135 – 225 IU/L

    0 - 1 month: 125 – 765 IU/L

    1 montn - 1 year: 170 – 450 IU/L

    1 - 2 years: 155 – 395 IU/L

    2 - 15 years: 120 – 300 IU/L

    15 years and over: 135 – 225 IU/L

  • Factors Affecting Result:

    Red blood cells contain much more lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) than serum. A haemolysed specimen is not acceptable. LDH activity is one of the most sensitive indicators of in vitro hemolysis. Causes...

    Red blood cells contain much more lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) than serum. A haemolysed specimen is not acceptable. LDH activity is one of the most sensitive indicators of in vitro hemolysis. Causes can include transportation via pneumatic tube, vigorous mixing, or traumatic venipuncture.

    Read More
  • Routine Contact Name:

    Duty Biochemist

  • Routine Telephone:

    Freeman: 0191 244 8889 
    RVI: 0191 282 9719

    Freeman: 0191 244 8889 
    RVI: 0191 282 9719

  • Routine Email:

Availability:

All times

All sites

Turn Around:

Urgent: within 1 hour
Non-urgent: within 4 hours

View all tests