Newcastle Laboratories

Apolipoprotein B, serum

Clinical Background:

Apo B is important in lipoprotein transport, being essential for the secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from the liver and gut. One molecule of apo B is present in each chylomicron, VLDL o...

Apo B is important in lipoprotein transport, being essential for the secretion of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins from the liver and gut. One molecule of apo B is present in each chylomicron, VLDL or LDL particle. There are two forms of apo B - apoB100 and apoB48. ApoB48 is secreted by enterocytes and is the major protein constituent of chylomicrons. ApoB100 is the major component of all lipoproteins except chylomicrons and HDL. The majority of circulating apoB100 is found in LDL. ApoB100 is the ligand for the LDL receptor on hepatocytes and in peripheral tissues. Elevated apo B100 is a marker of increased numbers of LDL particles and a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

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Test Details

  • Discipline:

    Biochemistry

    Biochemistry

  • Specimen Container Adult:

    Serum 

    Serum 

  • Specimen Container Paediatric:

    Serum

    Serum

  • Minimum Volume Adult:

    1 mL blood

    1 mL blood

  • Minimum Volume Paediatric:

    1 mL blood

    1 mL blood

  • Sample Stability:

    Unseparated: 24 hours

    Separated: 7 days at 4-8°C

    Unseparated: 24 hours

    Separated: 7 days at 4-8°C

  • Transport Requirements:

    Ambient temperature

    Ambient temperature

  • Interpretation:

    Apo B is raised in hyperlipoproteinaemia types IIa, IIb, IV and V). Other disorders such as hepatic obstruction, renal disease, diabetes, hypothyroidism, Cushings and anorexia may lead to increased...

    Apo B is raised in hyperlipoproteinaemia types IIa, IIb, IV and V). Other disorders such as hepatic obstruction, renal disease, diabetes, hypothyroidism, Cushings and anorexia may lead to increased Apo B. Decreased apo B levels are found in abetalipoproteinaemia, LCAT deficiency, hyperlipoproteinaemia type I, and lipoprotein lipase cofactor (apo CII) deficiency. Hyperthyroidism, malnutrition, malabsorption, severe hepatocellular dysfunction, Reye’s syndrome and myeloma may lead to decreased apo B concentrations.

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  • Reference Ranges:

    Men: 0.66-1.33 g/L
    Women: 0.60-1.17 g/L

    Men: 0.66-1.33 g/L
    Women: 0.60-1.17 g/L

  • Factors Affecting Result:

    Gross haemolysis, icterus or lipaemia may interfere.

    Gross haemolysis, icterus or lipaemia may interfere.

  • Other Info:

    Plasma- Lithium Heparin also acceptable

    Plasma- Lithium Heparin also acceptable

  • Routine Contact Name:

    Duty Biochemist

  • Routine Telephone:

    Freeman: 0191 244 8889

    RVI: 0191 282 9719

    Freeman: 0191 244 8889

    RVI: 0191 282 9719

  • Routine Email:

    - For external users: TNU-Tr.duty.biochemist@nhs.net

    - For Trust users: DutyBiochemist@nuth.nhs.uk

  • Specialist Test:

    Yes

    Yes

  • Specialist Contact Name:

    Endocrine Lab

    Endocrine Lab

  • Specialist Telephone:

    0191 282 4025

    0191 282 4025

Availability:

Available 24/7
Site of analysis: RVI

Turn Around:

Within 3 full access days

Send To:

Department of Blood Sciences

Level 3
Leazes Wing
Royal Victoria Infirmary
Queen Victoria Road
Newcastle upon Tyne
NE1 4LP

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