Newcastle Laboratories

Amylase, serum

Clinical Background:

Amylase is the enzyme concerned with the breakdown of dietary starch and glycogen to maltose. It is present in pancreatic juice, saliva and in the liver, fallopian tubes and muscle. It exists as tw...

Amylase is the enzyme concerned with the breakdown of dietary starch and glycogen to maltose. It is present in pancreatic juice, saliva and in the liver, fallopian tubes and muscle. It exists as two isoenzymes: pancreatic (P‐type) and non‐pancreatic (S‐type). Amylase is primarily used in the diagnosis of acute pancreatitis.

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Test Details

  • Discipline:

    Biochemistry

    Biochemistry

  • Specimen Container Adult:

    Serum-SST

    Serum-SST

  • Specimen Container Paediatric:

    Serum-Plain tube

    Serum-Plain tube

  • Minimum Volume Adult:

    1 mL blood

    1 mL blood

  • Minimum Volume Paediatric:

    0.5 mL blood

    0.5 mL blood

  • Sample Stability:

    Unseparated: 3 days

    Separated:
    at +15° to +25°C 7 days
    at +2° to +8°C 1 month

    Unseparated: 3 days

    Separated:
    at +15° to +25°C 7 days
    at +2° to +8°C 1 month

  • Interpretation:

    Causes of raised Amylase levels include:-
    • Marked increase in acute pancreatitis, severe uraemia and severe diabetic ketoacidosis. In acute pancreatitis, serum amylase activity typically increases...

    Causes of raised Amylase levels include:-
    • Marked increase in acute pancreatitis, severe uraemia and severe diabetic ketoacidosis. In acute pancreatitis, serum amylase activity typically increases within 2‐12 h of onset of symptoms, has a 24 h peak and remains elevated for 3‐7 days.
    • Moderate increase in other acute abdominal disorders such as a perforated peptic ulcer, acute cholecystitis, intestinal obstruction, abdominal trauma, ruptured ectopic pregnancy. It is also moderately raised with salivary gland disorders such as mumps, salivary calculi and after sialography.
    • Morphine administration.
    • Myocardial infarction.
    • Acute alcoholic intoxication (transient).

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  • Reference Ranges:

    All ages: 0 - 100 U/L

    All ages: 0 - 100 U/L

  • Factors Affecting Result:

    Amylase is inhibited by most non‐heparin anticoagulants including
    citrate, EDTA and oxalate.
    Icodextrin-based drugs may lead to decreased amylase values.

    Amylase is inhibited by most non‐heparin anticoagulants including
    citrate, EDTA and oxalate.
    Icodextrin-based drugs may lead to decreased amylase values.

  • Other Info:

    Plasma- Lithium Heparin also acceptable

    Plasma- Lithium Heparin also acceptable

  • Routine Contact Name:

    Duty Biochemist

  • Routine Telephone:

    Freeman: 0191 244 8889
    RVI: 0191 282 9719

    Freeman: 0191 244 8889
    RVI: 0191 282 9719

  • Routine Email:

    - For external users: TNU-Tr.duty.biochemist@nhs.net

    - For Trust users: DutyBiochemist@nuth.nhs.uk

Availability:

All times
All sites

Turn Around:

Urgent sample: within 1 hour

Non-urgent sample: within 4 hours

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